How to Hide Anti-Keylogger Window in AOL Shield Pro Browser

AOL Shield Pro is a secure web browser based on the Chromium project. It is basically exactly like the Chrome web browser but with many security features built inside it. For example, it prevents anyone to capture the screenshots of the web browser window (we had to disable the screen capture protection to take the screenshots), it has modules to thwart the keyloggers attempts to capture your input data, it can detect and block phishing sites and many more.

When you use AOL Shield Pro browser, it shows a weird looking thing in the title bar of the browser window. This thing is the anti-keylogger window and it keeps randomly generating key events to foil all the keylogging attempts. It shows up in the title bar to indicate that the anti-keylogger module of AOL Shield Pro is working.

AOL Shield Pro Anti-Keylogger

But if you do not like this to be displayed in the title bar, then you can change the settings in the browser to hide it. Here is how you can do this:

  1. Launch AOL Shield Pro, click on the menu icon and select Settings from the menu.
  2. On the settings screen, select Advanced and then Anti-keylogging.
  3. Use the small flip button against Show anti-keylogging window to disable this setting.AOL Shield Pro Anti-Keylogger
  4. The anti-keylogger window will be hidden instantly.

AOL Shield Pro uses two layers of anti-keylogging protection. First, it prevents any program to use a Windows Hook in order to listen to the messages meant only for AOL Shield Pro. And secondly, it replaces the actual keys pressed with randomly generated characters to prevent anyone from capturing your keystrokes. Through the use of this dual layer of protection, it is able to completely block all kinds of keyloggers and other malicious software that try to siphon off your sensitive data and financial information.

One thought on “How to Hide Anti-Keylogger Window in AOL Shield Pro Browser

  1. I wish you had a key logger, such as found in many parental protection apps, installed on the test computer. Then we could have seen if the protection was effective, or just marketing fluff.

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